National Register of Historic Places

Note:  No two pieces of wood look alike.  Within a board, two sections can have different coloration. The wood samples below are generic swatches to give you some idea about whether the wood is dark or light. The actual woods may vary in color. 

Preserving places that are significant to our heritage is one way of ensuring future generations will be able to “see” West Virginia’s past and not just “read” about it.  The National Register of Historic Places assists in doing just that.  By placing sites on the register, West Virginia’s historic and archeological resources are protected.  We can get a glimpse into the lives of those who came before us and, by doing so, cultivate a sense of pride and respect for them.  Every historic site has a story to tell and it is The National Register of Historic Places that keeps that story alive. All the woods from locations on the register were obtained during renovations or restorations salvaging wood which might well otherwise have ended up in dumpsters headed for landfills.

Wood SourceHistory of WoodWood Sample
Adaland Mansion – Barn Barbour County Poplar

This poplar was used in the restoration of the barn at Adaland. It was constructed about 1850 by the son of the original settler of the land. It is of post and beam construction with yellow poplar and other hardwoods used in the interior. The barn was joined by the stately brick home in 1870.

Andrews Methodist Church Taylor County Oak

This wood was reclaimed during repairs to the floor of the church which has been officially named the International Mother's Day Shrine.

Anna Jarvis House Taylor County Poplar

This wood was reclaimed from the Anna Jarvis House, birthplace of Anna Jarvis who founded Mother’s Day and Gen. George B. McClelland’s first field headquarters during his 1861 western Virginia campaign.

Photo By JERRYE & ROY KLOTZ MD [CC BY-SA 3.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

Arthurdale Center Hall Preston County Oak

The Center Hall was the idea of Eleanor Roosevelt who supervised its construction (circa 1934) as part of the New Deal project. This flooring upon which Mrs. Roosevelt danced was removed during the 1996 renovation.

Arthurdale House 11 Preston County Pine

This wood was baseboard reclaimed from House 11 built as part of the New Deal project in the 1930’s.

Arthurdale House 11 - Barn Preston County Chestnut

This chestnut was reclaimed from a batten board from the original barn built to serve the family of House 11 built as part of the New Deal project in the 1930’s.

Arthurdale House 11 - Chicken Coop Preston County Oak

This wood was reclaimed from a chicken coop used by the family living in House 11 built as part of the New Deal project in the 1930’s.

Barbour County Courthouse – Window Pine

The Barbour County Courthouse n Philippi, WV was constructed between 1903 and 1905. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. This wood was reclaimed in 2015 and was part of an old window frame.

By Valerius Tygart [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 3.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

 

Barrackville Covered Bridge Marion County White Oak

The Barrackville Covered Bridge was built in 1853 over Buffalo Creek by Lemuel Chenoweth. At 146 feet, it is the second longest remaining covered bridge in WV.

Photo By Brian M. Powell [CC BY-SA 3.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Barrackville_Covered_Bridge_-_Side_in_Winter.jpg

 

Carrolton Covered Bridge Barbour County Poplar

This wood was part of the Carrollton Covered Bridge, in Barbour County, West Virginia, USA, which is the second longest and third oldest surviving covered bridge in the state. The wooden bridge spans the Buckhannon River near Carrollton and was built in 1856. National Register of Historic Places.

Photo By Brian M. Powell [CC BY-SA 3.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons  https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Carrollton_Covered_Bridge.jpg 

Carskadon Mansion Mineral County Oak

Thomas R. Carskadon House also known as the Carskadon Mansion and "Radical Hill," is a historic home located on Radical Hill overlooking Mineral Street, in Keyser, Mineral County, WV. Built about 1886, it is the former residence of Thomas R. Carskadon, an influential Mineral County farmer and political leader.

By Generic1139 [CC BY-SA 3.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

Cockayne Farmstead Marshall County Oak

This pen was crafted from wood from the Cockayne Farmstead. The larger house (on the National Register of Historic Places) was built in 1850. The smaller one is pictured in a 1877 print but may have been used as the family home while the larger house was being built.

Photo By Cockayne Farmstead [CC BY-SA 3.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Davis & Elkins Gatehouse Randolph County Poplar

At the entrance to the Davis & Elkins campus stands the Gatehouse, a quaint structure that doubled as a gatekeeper’s/caretaker’s residence during the years when the Elkins family spent their summers at Halliehurst. Today, the tiny historic building houses the D&E College Office of Public Safety.

By Generic1139 [CC BY-SA 3.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

Davis & Elkins Graceland Mansion Randolph County Oak

Completed in 1893, Graceland is a stone mansion that, along with a 360-acre estate, served as the summer home of Senator Henry Gassaway Davis. In 1945, it was presented to D&E College by the WV Presbyterian Educational Fund and was used for student housing until 1970.

Photo By Carol M. Highsmith [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Davis & Elkins College - Halliehurst Randolph County Cherry

Built (circa 1890) by Senator Stephen B. Elkins as a summer home, Halliehurst Mansion and the surrounding farm were donated to Davis and Elkins College in the late 1920s by his widow, Mrs. Hallie Davis Elkins. It now houses the Office of the President.

Photo By Carol M. Highsmith [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Davis & Elkins College - The Icehouse Randolph County Poplar

Completed in 1893, Graceland is a stone mansion that, along with a 360-acre estate, served as the summer home of Senator Henry Gassaway Davis. In 1945, it was presented to D&E College by the WV Presbyterian Educational Fund and was used for student housing until 1970.

Photo By Carol M. Highsmith [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Doddridge County Courthouse Oak

 

The Doddridge County Courthouse was designed in the Victorian Romanesque style by J. Charles Fulton and was built in 1899. This wood was reclaimed from a baseboard in the main entrance to the courthouse.

By Tim Kiser (w:User:Malepheasant) [CC BY-SA 2.5  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5) or CC BY-SA 2.5  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], from Wikimedia Commons

Fairmont Senior High School Marion County Maple

This maple was reclaimed from the floor of the gym in Fairmont Senior High School following water damage caused by a fire suppression sprinkler.

Photo By Cmcginni [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons

Grafton B&O Depot Taylor County Poplar

This wood was reclaimed from the Grafton B&O Railroad Depot. It was part of one of the cages on the basement level of the depot. It was dedicated on August 11, 1911 and served proudly until it closed in the mid-1980s.

Brian M. Powell [CC BY-SA 3.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Grafton Willard Hotel Taylor County Pine

This wood was reclaimed from a door from the iconic Willard Hotel. The hotel officially opened on April 12, 1912 with an elaborate banquet attended by state and local dignitaries and railroad officials.

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Harrison County Courthouse Pine

Completed in 1932, the current Harrison County Courthouse stands on the site of three of the four courthouses raised in Clarksburg. The plaza is home to a statue of “Stonewall” Jackson and the flagstaff of the U.S.S. West Virginia, sunk at Pearl Harbor.

Photo By Upstateherd [CC BY-SA 3.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

Helvetia Cheese Haus Randolph County Oak

Cheesemaking has long been a tradition in Helvetia.  Original settlers made cheese in their homes as a regular staple and to accompany their homemade wine. In the 1970s, when the demand for the famous Helvetia Cheese grew beyond the supply from homes, the Cheese Haus was erected and Helvetia Cheese was produced for several years to supply the local Swiss restaurant, The Hutte, and to sell to the public. Cheese is no longer produced in the Cheese Haus but the building and cheese-making equipment have been preserved.

Henderson Hall Plantation Wood County Poplar

This wood was reclaimed from the Henderson Hall Plantation near Williamstown, WV. The house, grounds and Henderson family cemetery is designated the Henderson Hall Historic District and is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places.

Photo By Chrispainter1966 [CC BY-SA 3.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

Hennen Building Marion County Oak

This piece of wood was reclaimed from the Hennen Building located at 120 Adams Street in Fairmont, WV. It is on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Fairmont Downtown Historic District.

International Mother's Day Shrine (Andrews Methodist Episcopal Church) Taylor County Oak

The first Mother’s Day Service was held on May 10,, 1908 in the Andrews Methodist Episcopal Church in Grafton, WV. In May 1962, the church was declared to be The International Mother’s Day Shrine and in 1992 was designated a National Historic Landmark. This oak was removed in September, 2014 as part of repairs to the floor on the first floor of the shrine.

Photo By Carol M. Highsmith [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Jackson's Mill - Assembly Hall Lewis County Chestnut

In 1921, Jackson’s Mill was deeded to WVU to serve as a youth facility and was developed into the nation’s first state 4-H camp. This wormy chestnut was reclaimed during a renovation of the Assembly Hall.

Photo  By Carol M. Highsmith [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Jackson's Mill - Barbour Cottage Lewis County Pine

In 1921, Jackson’s Mill was deeded to WVU to serve as a youth facility and was developed into the nation’s first state 4-H camp. This wood was reclaimed during a renovation of the Barbour Cottage.

Jackson's Mill - Calhoun Cottage Lewis County Oak

In 1921, Jackson’s Mill was deeded to WVU to serve as a youth facility and was developed into the nation’s first state 4-H camp. This wood was reclaimed during a renovation of the Calhoun Cottage.

Jackson's Mill - Electric Energy Center Lewis County Cedar

In 1921, Jackson’s Mill was deeded to WVU to serve as a youth facility and was developed into the nation’s first state 4-H camp. This wood was reclaimed during a renovation of the Electric Energy Center built in 1940.

Jackson's Mill - Kanawha Cottage Lewis County Pine

In 1921, Jackson’s Mill was deeded to WVU to serve as a youth facility and was developed into the nation’s first state 4-H camp. This wood was reclaimed during a renovation of the Kanawha Cottage.

Lost Creek Depot Harrison County Poplar

Built in 1892, the Lost Creek Depot became the largest shipping point for cattle in West Virginia in 1915 and on the entire B&O system, east of the Mississippi in 1923.

Photo By Ceh2624 [CC BY-SA 3.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

Manningtion High School Marion County Pine

This wood was reclaimed from the Mannington High School which was built in 1902 and ceased being a high school in 1979 when North Marion High School was opened. The building remains in use as Mannington Middle School and is the oldest active school in WV.

Monongalia County Court House Redwood

Erected in 1932, the current Monongalia County Courthouse is the fourth courthouse built on the same site. This redwood was reclaimed in 2017 from benches in the courtyard . The courthouse was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1985.

Photo By Stryker33 [CC BY-SA 3.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

New Martinsville Masonic Lodge Wetzel County Oak

This wood was reclaimed from the old home of Masonic Lodge #39 at 301 Main Street in New Martinsville, WV. The Temple was built in 1913.

Photo By Highsmith, Carol M., 1946-, photographer https://picryl.com/media/masonic-hall-222-richmond-street-huntington-west-virginia

Old Main - Original Nicholas County High School Nicholas County Oak

Old Main, the former Nicholas County High School, was constructed in 1913 and graduated its first class in 1915. From 1915 to 1930, it also served as the site of a State Normal School for teachers.

Photo By Nyttend [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons

Pearl S. Buck Birthplace Pocahontas County Mulberry

This mulberry was reclaimed for a tree which was brought as a sampling from China by Mrs. Buck’s missionary parents. It stood in front of the house by the right until it toppled in 1997.

Photo By Beeflower [CC BY 3.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

Sample unavailable
at this time.

Philippi Covered Bridge – 1938 Renovation Barbour County Poplar

This poplar was reclaimed as part of the 1938 renovation when the floor was replaced with a concrete, reinforced one and provided as a souvenir at the Covered Bridge Centennial, Philippi, WV, August 28-30, 1952.

Photo By Hu Maxwell [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Philippi Covered Bridge – 1989 Renovation Barbour County Poplar

This poplar was reclaimed as part of the 1989-1991 renovation following the February 2, 1989 fire which virtually destroyed the bridge which was built in 1852 at a cost of just over $12,000.

Photo By Valerius Tygart [CC BY-SA 3.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

Philippi Covered Bridge – 2015 Renovation Barbour County White Oak

This white oak was reclaimed as part of the 2015 renovation of the bridge. The wood served as a wedge holding tightly the mortise and tenon joints securing the main arches in the interior.

Photo By Carol M. Highsmith [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Post Mansion Barn Upshur County Oak

This oak was reclaimed from the barn (circa 1860) adjoining the Post Mansion on the Island in Buckhannon, WV. The Mansion, built in 1860, and property were used as part of the Underground Railroad.

Randolph County Courthouse Oak

This wood was reclaimed from the attic of the Randolph County Courthouse which was built between 1902 and 1904. It is constructed of brick and faced with stone with contrasting smooth and textured stone trim. The tower flanking the entrance stands 150 feet tall.

Photo By Carol M. Highsmith [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Rehobeth Methodist Church Monroe County Cherry

This cherry is from a tree at Rehoboth Methodist Church in Monroe County, WV. It was the first Protestant church built west of the Alleghenies and is the oldest church in West Virginia. The building was dedicated in 1786 by Francis Asbury, the first Methodist bishop in the US.

By UnknownUnknown author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Robinson Grand Theater Harrison County Pine

The Robinson Grand Theater opened on February 7, 1913. In 1927, it was the 13th theater in the United States to add sound equipment and start showing “Talkies.” A fire on the roof on May 31, 1939 virtually destroyed the house and the stage but the 1927 façade was retained. They continued to show movies until 1984 when it was purchased by James LaRosa and renamed the Rose Garden Theater.

Carol M. Highsmith [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Salem Depot Harrison County Oak

The current depot was built in 1912. In 1985, an historical 129-year era of rail service ended for Salem when the last scheduled train traveled the tracks through the city. 

Trans-Allegheny Lunatic Asylum Lewis County Maple

The Trans-Allegheny Lunatic Asylum (originally the Weston State Hospital), constructed between 1858 and 1881, is the largest hand-cut stone masonry building in North America. The original hospital, designed to house 250 souls, was open to patients in 1864 and reached its peak in the 1950's with 2,400 patients. This wood was reclaimed during 2018 renovations of the fourth floor.

Photo By Richie Diesterheft from Chicago, IL, USA (Trans Allegheny Lunatic Asylum From A Distance) [CC BY 2.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Traveler's Rest (Old Stone House) Mineral County Oak

Traveler’s Rest, also known as Old Stone House, is a historic home located near Burlington, Mineral County, West Virginia. It was built as a stagecoach stop to service the Northwestern Turnpike. It serviced the corridor between Winchester, VA and Parkersburg, VA (now WV).

Photo By Generic1139 [CC BY-SA 3.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

Tucker County Bank Oak

This wood was reclaimed from the Tucker County Bank Building which was completed in 1902 and has housed the Masonic Lodge, the Board of Education and other businesses.

Photo By Generic1139 [CC BY-SA 3.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

Upshur County Courthouse Pine

This pine was reclaimed from the clock tower of the Upshur County Courthouse which was built in 1899. The Courthouse is part of the Buckhannon Downtown Historic District which is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Photo By Tim Kiser (w:User:Malepheasant) [CC BY-SA 2.5  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], from Wikimedia Commons

Waldomore Harrison County Oak

This wood was reclaimed from The Waldomore which was built in 1836 by the parents of Nathan Goff, who became Secretary of the Navy. In 1930 it was deeded to the City of Clarksburg, WV to be used as a library or museum. 

Photo By Carol M. Highsmith [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Western Maryland Depot Tucker County Oak

This wood was a piece of flooring from the Parsons Depot (Western Maryland Railroad Depot) which was built in 1888,

Photo By Generic1139 [CC BY-SA 3.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

Weston State Hospital Lewis County Maple

The Weston State Hospital (now known as the Trans-Allegheny Lunatic Asylum), constructed between 1858 and 1881, is the largest hand-cut stone masonry building in North America. The original hospital, designed to house 250 souls, was open to patients in 1864 and reached its peak in the 1950's with 2,400 patients. This wood was reclaimed during 2018 renovations of the fourth floor.

Photo By Richie Diesterheft from Chicago, IL, USA (Trans Allegheny Lunatic Asylum From A Distance) [CC BY 2.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Wetzel County Courthouse - Attic Oak

This wood was reclaimed from the attic of the Wetzel County Courthouse which was built in 1901 to replace the wooden one which stood on the same site. The tower in the center is the tallest part of any building in Wetzel County.

Photo By The original uploader was Rrenner at English Wikipedia. [CC BY-SA 2.5  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], from Wikimedia Commons

Wetzel County Courthouse - Judge's Chambers Oak

This wood was reclaimed from the judge’s chambers of the Wetzel County Courthouse which was built in 1901. The tower in the center is the tallest part of any building in Wetzel County.

William S. Gilliland Log Cabin Kanawha County Poplar

This wood was reclaimed from the William S. Gilliland Log Cabin which was constructed in 1847. The Gillilands resided there until 1868 when the Neale family purchased the property. It is situated at Louden Heights and Bridge Road in Charleston.

Photo By Pubdog [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons

WV State Penitentiary Marshall County Pine

The West Virginia State Penitentiary is a gothic-style prison located in Moundsville, West Virginia. Now withdrawn and retired from prison use, it operated from 1876 to 1995. This wood was collected from areas being renovated on the grounds of the facility.

By Rhonda Humphreys [CC BY-SA 4.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

WVU - Martin Hall Monongalia County Beech

Completed in 1870, Martin Hall, the oldest building on the University campus, was originally named University Hall and was renamed in 1889 in honor of WVU’s first president, the Rev. Alexander Martin.

Photo By Swimmerguy269 [CC BY-SA 3.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], from Wikimedia Commons

WVU - Woodburn Hall Monongalia County Chestnut

This chestnut was reclaimed from a door jamb from Room 208. Woodburn, the second WVU building, was completed in 1876. In 1910, the iconic Seth Thomas clock was moved from the cupola of Martin Hall to the Woodburn tower.

Photo By Carol M. Highsmith [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

WVU - Woodburn Hall Monongalia County Maple

This maple was reclaimed from a classroom floor replaced in the 1980s. Woodburn, the second WVU building, was completed in 1876. In 1910, the Seth Thomas clock was moved from the cupola of Martin Hall to Woodburn tower.