Lewis County

Note:  No two pieces of wood look alike.  Within a board, two sections can have different coloration. The wood samples below are generic swatches to give you some idea about whether the wood is dark or light. The actual woods may vary in color.

My collection of woods represents WV woods with historical or sentimental significance.  As a retired educator I have a special place in my heart for schools and especially schools that are no longer in operation.  As an example, I live in Taylor County and through school consolidations over the years, we only have five schools left but I have wood from 13, some of which date to the pre-school integration era. 

At fairs and festivals, I use a banner that states that I have “Hundreds of woods with two stories – 1.  Where did the wood come from? and 2. How in the devil did I get it?”  I have become fascinated with the rich history of our great state as it is told through the amazing structures scattered across the state and the wonderful people who have given me wood from around the state.  Oh, if you give me a piece of wood I want for my collection, I will make you a free pen made from that wood or others in my collection.

I have developed a fondness for wood collected from our colleges and universities, courthouses, schools, covered bridges, battlefields, and other places of note.  I challenge people to pick up one of my pens, show it to me, let me read the little tag that identifies it and get prepared to hear the answers to the two questions above.  It surprises even me to see an old math teacher become so fascinated with the history as told by the woods.

Wood SourceHistory of WoodWood Sample
Alum Bridge Elementary School OakThis wood was reclaimed from the Alum Bridge Elementary School which had served students in the Alum Bridge and surrounding communities since opening in 1929. The school closed in 2015 when it combined with Troy School in Gilmer County to form Leading Creek School.

Central School OakThis wood was reclaimed from the former Central School which was completed in 1926 and served students of the Weston area until its closure in 1999 when Peterson-Central opened.

Horner Elementary School ChestnutThis wood was reclaimed from the Horner Elementary School which was built circa 1938 and now serves as the home for the Hacker’s Creek Pioneer Descendants.

Jackson's Mill Animal Barn Poplar Jackson’s Mill was the childhood home of Gen. Stonewall Jackson. In 1921, Jackson’s Mill was deeded to WVU to serve as a youth facility and was developed into the nation’s first state 4-H camp. This wood was reclaimed from feed trough in the animal barn.

Jackson's Mill Assembly Hall ChestnutIn 1921, Jackson’s Mill was deeded to WVU to serve as a youth facility and was developed into the nation’s first state 4-H camp. This wormy chestnut was reclaimed during a renovation of the Assembly Hall.

Jackson's Mill Barbour Cottage PineIn 1921, Jackson’s Mill was deeded to WVU to serve as a youth facility and was developed into the nation’s first state 4-H camp. This wood was reclaimed during a renovation of the Barbour Cottage.

Jackson's Mill Calhoun Cottage OakIn 1921, Jackson’s Mill was deeded to WVU to serve as a youth facility and was developed into the nation’s first state 4-H camp. This wood was reclaimed during a renovation of the Calhoun Cottage.

Jackson's Mill Chapel RedwoodJackson’s Mill was the childhood home of Gen. Stonewall Jackson. In 1921, Jackson’s Mill was deeded to WVU to serve as a youth facility and was developed into the nation’s first state 4-H camp. This wood was reclaimed from the chapel.

Jackson's Mill Electric Energy Center CedarIn 1921, Jackson’s Mill was deeded to WVU to serve as a youth facility and was developed into the nation’s first state 4-H camp. This wood was reclaimed during a renovation of the Electric Energy Center built in 1940.

Jackson's Mill Flameway Hall OakIn 1921, Jackson’s Mill was deeded to WVU to serve as a youth facility and was developed into the nation’s first state 4-H camp. This oak flooring was reclaimed during the demolition of Flameway Hall in 2014 following severe damage from a fallen tree.

Jackson's Mill Kanawha Cottage PineIn 1921, Jackson’s Mill was deeded to WVU to serve as a youth facility and was developed into the nation’s first state 4-H camp. This wood was reclaimed during a renovation of the Kanawha Cottage.

Jackson's Mill Mingo Tree CherryJackson’s Mill was the childhood home of Gen. Stonewall Jackson. In 1921, Jackson’s Mill was deeded to WVU to serve as a youth facility and was developed into the nation’s first state 4-H camp. This wood was reclaimed from the tree of the Mingo Tribe. The tree stood proudly in the lawn in front of the dining hall until it fell.

Jane Lew High School OakThis wood was reclaimed from the Jane Lew High School which served high school students in the Jane Lew community from 1935 until 1963. It was torn down in 1995 after serving as a junior high and elementary school.

Jane Lew Junior High School OakThis wood was reclaimed from the Jane Lew High School which served high school students in the Jane Lew community from 1935 until 1963. It was torn down in 1995 after serving as a junior high and elementary school.

Old Lewis County High School PineThis wood was shipped from California specifically as bleachers for the original Lewis County High School which now houses Robert L. Bland Middle School.

Peterson Cemetery PineThis pine was claimed from a storm damaged tree in the Peterson Cemetery located at the intersection of Interstate 79 and US Routes 33 and 119 beside the northbound on-ramp.

Polk Creek Elementary School PineThis wood was reclaimed from a shelf in a classroom of the abandoned Polk Creek Elementary School which served the western part of Weston for years.

Robert L. Bland Middle School WalnutThis walnut was reclaimed from the art room of Robert L. Bland Middle School.

Stonewall Resort AshThis ash was reclaimed from a dead tree on the grounds of Stonewall Resort situated within Stonewall Jackson Lake State Park.

Stonewall Resort Cabin PoplarThis wood was reclaimed from the Fox Cabin which was moved in August 2015 about 8 miles to its current location on the grounds of Stonewall Resort.

Stonewall Resort CherryThis beautiful cherry was harvested from the grounds of the Stonewall Resort. In addition to the pieces used for pens, other sections of the tree, which had died years ago, were used as decorations within the resort.

Stonewall Resort Arnold Palmer Signature Golf Course PecanThis beautiful pecan was harvested in 2002 to create the fairway for the 12th hole of the Arnold Palmer designed golf course at Stonewall Resort.

Trans-Allegheny Lunatic Asylum MapleThe Trans-Allegheny Lunatic Asylum (originally the Weston State Hospital), constructed between 1858 and 1881, is the largest hand-cut stone masonry building in North America. The original hospital, designed to house 250 souls, was open to patients in 1864 and reached its peak in the 1950's with 2,400 patients. This wood was reclaimed during 2018 renovations of the fourth floor.

Walkersville Post Office PineThis wood was reclaimed from a door from the Walkersville Post Office. The second floor of this building served as a hotel for a number of years.

Weston Armory PineThis wood was reclaimed from the bleachers in the Weston Armory which was purchased by the Lewis County Board of Education to become the Bus Garage for Lewis County Schools.

Weston Depot OakThis old growth oak was reclaimed from the Weston Train Depot which was built in the late 1800s. The building later served as the Weston Cannery and more recently the Bus Garage for Lewis County Schools.

Weston High School PineThis wood was reclaimed from the Weston High School which first served as Weston High School, then Lewis County High School and then Weston Junior High School.

Weston Junior High School PineThis wood was reclaimed from the Weston High School which first served as Weston High School, then Lewis County High School and then Weston Junior High School.

Weston State Hospital MapleThe Weston State Hospital (now known as the Trans-Allegheny Lunatic Asylum), constructed between 1858 and 1881, is the largest hand-cut stone masonry building in North America. The original hospital, designed to house 250 souls, was open to patients in 1864 and reached its peak in the 1950's with 2,400 patients. This wood was reclaimed during 2018 renovations of the fourth floor.