Marion County

Note:  No two pieces of wood look alike.  Within a board, two sections can have different coloration. The wood samples below are generic swatches to give you some idea about whether the wood is dark or light. The actual woods may vary in color.

My collection of woods represents WV woods with historical or sentimental significance.  As a retired educator I have a special place in my heart for schools and especially schools that are no longer in operation.  As an example, I live in Taylor County and through school consolidations over the years, we only have five schools left but I have wood from 13, some of which date to the pre-school integration era. 

At fairs and festivals, I use a banner that states that I have “Hundreds of woods with two stories – 1.  Where did the wood come from? and 2. How in the devil did I get it?”  I have become fascinated with the rich history of our great state as it is told through the amazing structures scattered across the state and the wonderful people who have given me wood from around the state.  Oh, if you give me a piece of wood I want for my collection, I will make you a free pen made from that wood or others in my collection.

I have developed a fondness for wood collected from our colleges and universities, courthouses, schools, covered bridges, battlefields, and other places of note.  I challenge people to pick up one of my pens, show it to me, let me read the little tag that identifies it and get prepared to hear the answers to the two questions above.  It surprises even me to see an old math teacher become so fascinated with the history as told by the woods.

Wood SourceHistory of WoodWood Sample
Baptist Temple PoplarThis wood was reclaimed from the choir loft constructed in 1964 and removed in the sanctuary renovation of The Baptist Temple in 2014. The church sits at the intersection of Morgantown Avenue and Haymond Street in Fairmont.

Baptist Temple AshThis wood was reclaimed from the choir loft constructed in 1964 and removed in the sanctuary renovation of The Baptist Temple in 2014. The church sits at the intersection of Morgantown Avenue and Haymond Street in Fairmont.

Barrackville Covered Bridge White OakThe Barrackville Covered Bridge was built in 1853 over Buffalo Creek by Lemuel Chenoweth. At 146 feet, it is the second longest remaining covered bridge in WV.

Barrackville School PineBarrackville High School was established in 1910 and became Barrackville Middle/Elementary School in 1979 when the high school was part of the consolidation resulting in the opening of North Marion High School.

Camp Mar-Mac OakThis wood was reclaimed from one of the very old cabins which housed approximately 20 campers at Camp Mar-Mac. The Camp was named for Margaret Rexroad and William (Mac) McComas who led the 4-H program when the current site was opened in 1924.

East Fairmont High School (Old School) ChestnutThis wormy chestnut was reclaimed from the office of the “old” East Fairmont High School during its demolition in the summer of 2014.

Fairmont Moose Lodge #9 OakThis flooring was reclaimed from the Fairmont Moose Lodge #9 which was built in the early 1900s. The building at 100 Fairmont Avenue was acquired by the Moose lodge in 1940. The building served the Moose Lodge until about 2009.

Fairmont Senior High School MapleThis maple was reclaimed from the floor of the gym in Fairmont Senior High School following water damage caused by a fire suppression sprinkler.

Fairmont State Feaster Center Floor MapleThis maple was reclaimed from the floor of the Feaster Center on the campus of Fairmont State University. The Center opened in 1978 with a rubber floor which was replaced in 1984 with this maple floor which was in use for 30 years before being removed in May 2014.

Fairmont State Feaster Center Bleachers Pine This pine was reclaimed from the bleachers of the Feaster Center on the campus of Fairmont State University. The Center opened in 1978. The bleachers were replaced during a 2014 renovation.

Fairmont State Feaster Center Hall of Fame CherryThis cherry was reclaimed during a 2017 renovation of the Fairmont State University Hall of Fame in the Feaster Center. Members were inducted in 1993, 1997, and annually beginning in 2001.


Fairmont State Mound Tree Poplar“We think we are most happy in the selection of our name, The Mound. Situated near the center of the campus is the Historic Mound, upon which grows a stately sycamore tree, in which birds of days gone by have been born, reared, educated, and graduated into the knowledge and mysteries of life.” - 1908 Fairmont State Normal School Yearbook This wood is from the present day Mound Tree - a poplar which was removed in 2014.

Fairmont State Turley Center OakThis oak was reclaimed during a renovation involving the mantle of the fireplace in the Fairmont State University Turley Center. The Center houses Student Services and was formerly home to “The Nickel.”

Fairmont YMCA OakThis flooring was reclaimed from the Fairmont YMCA which was built in the early 1900s. The building at 100 Fairmont Avenue was acquired by the Moose lodge in 1940. The building served the Moose Lodge until about 2009.

First United Methodist Church Pew OakThis oak was reclaimed from the First United Methodist Church which proudly stood at 322 Fairmont Avenue (on the corner of Fairmont Avenue and 3rd Street) in Fairmont prior to its demolition in the summer of 2014.

First United Methodist Church Communion Tray PineThis wood was reclaimed from a communion tray from the First United Methodist Church which proudly stood at 322 Fairmont Avenue (on the corner of Fairmont Avenue and 3rd Street) in Fairmont prior to its demolition in the summer of 2014.

Grant Town Covered Bridge PoplarThis poplar was part of the Grant Town Covered Bridge which was destroyed in 1980 when a flood lifted it from its foundation and took it down stream where it slammed into the bank and virtually exploded.

Hennen Building OakThis piece of wood was reclaimed from the Hennen Building located at 120 Adams Street in Fairmont, WV. It is on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Fairmont Downtown Historic District.

Mannington Community Building Hough Building PineThis wood was reclaimed from the bleachers of the Mannington Community Building which was built as a WPA project in the 1930s. It continues to serves as a community center including being the Mannington Middle School gym.

Mannington Depot OakThe Mannington Depot was established in 1852 serving as a link to the Ohio River and the western frontier. This wood was reclaimed from the current structure which was built in 1906 and closed in 1957.

Manningtion High School PineThis wood was reclaimed from the Mannington High School which was built in 1902 and ceased being a high school in 1979 when North Marion High School was opened. The building remains in use as Mannington Middle School and is the oldest active school in WV.

Marion County Armory (Formerly Woody Williams Armory) MapleThis wood was reclaimed from the removeable floor from the Marion County Armory which was formerly the Woody Williams Armory and now serves as the home basketball court for Fairmont Senior High School and the offices of Marion County Schools.

Monongah Middle School OakThis wood was reclaimed from the Monongah High School which became Monongah Middle School in 1979 when the high school, along with Barrackville, Fairview, and Mannington High Schools were consolidated into Farmington High School to form North Marion High School.

Monongah High School OakThis wood was reclaimed from the Monongah High School which became Monongah Middle School in 1979 when the high school, along with Barrackville, Fairview, and Mannington High Schools were consolidated into Farmington High School to form North Marion High School.

North Marion High School OakThis wood was reclaimed from the library of North Marion High School which opened in September 1979 as a consolidation of Barrackville, Fairview, Mannington, and Monongah High Schools. The Huskies have captured nineteen state championships. The school is located about four miles from Farmington in Marion County.

Rivesville Power Station MapleThis piece of wood was reclaimed from the #10 transformer at the Rivesville Power Station which was built circa 1920. The wood had been soaked in oil for about 90 years to its removal in 2017. The Power Station is now owned by First Energy.

Ross Funeral Home White OakThis wood was reclaimed from “High Gate”, the family home of the Watson family which founded the Fairmont Coal Company which later merged with a number of other WV to form the Consolidated Coal Company, the forerunner of today’s Consol Energy.

Woody Williams Gym Bleachers PineThis wood was reclaimed for bleachers in the Woody Williams National Guard Armory named in honor of Medal of Honor recipient who received his honor from President Truman for his bravery at Iwo Jima.