Monongalia County

Note:  No two pieces of wood look alike.  Within a board, two sections can have different coloration. The wood samples below are generic swatches to give you some idea about whether the wood is dark or light. The actual woods may vary in color.

My collection of woods represents WV woods with historical or sentimental significance.  As a retired educator I have a special place in my heart for schools and especially schools that are no longer in operation.  As an example, I live in Taylor County and through school consolidations over the years, we only have five schools left but I have wood from 13, some of which date to the pre-school integration era. 

At fairs and festivals, I use a banner that states that I have “Hundreds of woods with two stories – 1.  Where did the wood come from? and 2. How in the devil did I get it?”  I have become fascinated with the rich history of our great state as it is told through the amazing structures scattered across the state and the wonderful people who have given me wood from around the state.  Oh, if you give me a piece of wood I want for my collection, I will make you a free pen made from that wood or others in my collection.

I have developed a fondness for wood collected from our colleges and universities, courthouses, schools, covered bridges, battlefields, and other places of note.  I challenge people to pick up one of my pens, show it to me, let me read the little tag that identifies it and get prepared to hear the answers to the two questions above.  It surprises even me to see an old math teacher become so fascinated with the history as told by the woods.

Wood SourceHistory of WoodWood Sample
Coopers Rock State Forest ChestnutThis American chestnut was used in 1936 as Shelter #3 at Coopers Rock State Forest was built as a CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) Project as Coopers Rock State Forest was being developed in American chestnut which was used in 1936 as Shelter #3 at Coopers Rock State Forest was built as a CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) Project as Coopers Rock State Forest was being developed in Monongalia County.

Easton School OakThis wood was reclaimed from Easton School which was combined with Woodburn School to form Eastwood School with opened on April 3, 2013.

Monongalia County Court House RedwoodErected in 1932, the current Monongalia County Courthouse is the fourth courthouse built on the same site. This redwood was reclaimed in 2017 from benches in the courtyard . The courthouse was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1985.

Morgantown High School Gym MapleThis maple was reclaimed from floor of the Arthur Clyde Gym at Morgantown High School. The gym was named in honor of Coach Clyde who coached the Mohigans for 30 seasons from 1924-1953.

Morgantown High School Oak Cabinetry OakThis oak was reclaimed from Morgantown High School during a renovation to the school.

Riverside Elementary School OakThis wood was reclaimed from Riverside Elementary School which served elementary students from Westover and Granville from 1919 until its closure in 2006.

Woodburn School OakThis wood was reclaimed from Woodburn School which was combined with Easton School to form Eastwood School with opened on April 3, 2013.

WVU - Blaney House OakThis oak was reclaimed from The Blaney House, the home of the President of WVU as it was prepared for Dr. E. Gordon Gee’s second tenure as president in 2014.

WVU - Clark Hall PoplarThis shelving was reclaimed from Clark Hall, home of the Department of Chemistry since its construction in 1925. Chemistry Hall was renamed in 1968 to honor Friend E. Clark who was department chair from 1919 to 1947.

WVU - Coliseum MapleThis maple was reclaimed from the floor of the WVU Coliseum which was built in 1970 and replaced the Fieldhouse. The Coliseum has a seating capacity of 14,000 compared with 6,000 at the Fieldhouse. The first event held at the Coliseum was a Grand Funk Railroad concert. The first basket scored in the new Coliseum was made by Charleston High School star Levi Phillips on December 1 in a 113-92 victory over the Colgate Red Raiders.

WVU - Creative Arts Center MahoganyThis mahogany was reclaimed from a piano in the Creative Arts Center on the Evansdale Campus of WVU. It was completed circa 1968 and includes a 1412 seat theatre as well as labs, classrooms and studios.

WVU - Martin Hall BeechCompleted in 1870, Martin Hall, the oldest building on the University campus, was originally named University Hall and was renamed in 1889 in honor of WVU’s first president, the Rev. Alexander Martin.

WVU - Mountaineer Field Puskar Center OakThis oak was reclaimed during a summer 2014 renovation of the Milan Puskar Center which is located under the bleachers in the south end of Mountaineer Field and houses the team dressing rooms, trophy rooms and offices.

WVU - Mountainlair OakThe Mountainlair, commonly called "the Lair" by students, is the three-floor student union building at West Virginia University. The current building dates to 1968 and replaced an earlier structure built in 1948. This wood was a flag pole from the stage in the Blue Ballroom.

WVU - Percival Hall OakThis oak was reclaimed during a summer 2014 renovation of Room 335 of Percival Hall on the Evansdale Campus of WVU. This oak was reclaimed during a summer 2014 renovation of Room 335 of Percival Hall on the Evansdale Campus of WVU. This room is regularly used by students in the Human Resources and Education College as well as Forestry students.

WVU - School of Medicine MapleThis wood was reclaimed from a chair in the Admissions Conference Room at the WVU School of Medicine.

WVU - Stansbury Hall MapleThis maple was reclaimed during a 1996 renovation of Stansbury Hall at WVU. The building opened in 1929 as the WVU Field House and was the home of WVU basketball until 1970. It was renamed in 1973 to honor former Athletic Director Harry Stansbury.

WVU - Stewart Hall CherryStewart Hall was built between 1900 and 1902, and housed the university library until 1931, when it became the Administration Building. It was renamed in the 1970s in honor of Irvin Stewart, president of the University from 1946 to 1958.

WVU - Woodburn Hall ChestnutThis chestnut was reclaimed from a door jamb from Room 208. Woodburn, the second WVU building, was completed in 1876. In 1910, the iconic Seth Thomas clock was moved from the cupola of Martin Hall to the Woodburn tower.

WVU - Woodburn Hall MapleThis maple was reclaimed from a classroom floor replaced in the 1980s. Woodburn, the second WVU building, was completed in 1876. In 1910, the Seth Thomas clock was moved from the cupola of Martin Hall to Woodburn tower.