WVU Featured Items

Welcome to Mountaineer Week.  This year’s craft show will, like so many, be virtual.    Each day beginning on Sunday, November 8th, I will be featuring one of the fourteen pieces of wood I have from WVU structures.

This maple was reclaimed from a chair in the conference room where students are informed whether they will be admitted into Med School.   I had met a doctor from WVU who was fascinated with my collection of woods.  He did not work in the building housing this conference room.  He instead worked at the Chestnut Ridge Hospital situated right behind the main instructional building for med students.  One day as he was headed home, he spied a pile of chairs that were being thrown away.  He quickly put one in his car and called me as soon as he got home.  I met him the next day for a cup of coffee and he proudly presented me with a nice stack of pieces from one of the chairs.  Of course, he got a free pen for his efforts.  You too can get a free pen if you provide me with a piece of wood I want for my collection.

I also really enjoy pens from wood with family sentimental ties.  I have made dozens over the years from “grandpa’s barn” or “grandma’s loom” or other pieces with family sentiment.  Let me help you make special family gifts.

Pens and pencils are available in a variety of styles and hardware colors as shown in the chart.  They can be ordered from my Store, located on the menu at the top of this page,  or by contacting me directly at 304-266-5207 or cartwrightscreations@gmail.com.   Pens and pencils are $40 each or $50 when personalized.  Please let me know if you have any questions.

Woodburn Hall is the most iconic building on the downtown campus, in fact, of all WVU buildings in my opinion.  I was the second building built and was built between 1874 and 1876.  Its square based dome houses the famous Seth Thomas clock which originally was in the cupola of Martin Hall.  It is the centerpiece of the Woodburn Circle which consists of Martin, Woodburn and Chitwood Halls.  Woodburn was first named New Hall and later renamed to salute the Woodburn Female Seminary which sat in the area of the Woodburn Circle.  It is the most recognizable building and is used in many of WVU’s promotional materials.

Pens and pencils are available in a variety of styles and hardware colors as shown in the chart.  They can be ordered from the Store, found in the menu at the top of this page or by contacting me directly at 304-266-5207 or cartwrightscreations@gmail.com.   Pens and pencils are $40 each or $50 when personalized.  Please let me know if you have any questions.

Many of us remember the good ole days when Stansbury Hall was called the Field House.  It was the home of WVU basketball during the era of Rod Thorn, Hot Rod Hundley, and Jerry West.  It was recently demolished to make room for a new Business and Economics built to be erected on the site.  I think I hit my first golf ball in a PE class in the Old Field House (it probably should have been my last).

Pens and pencils are available in a variety of styles and hardware colors as shown in the chart.  They can be ordered from the Store (the link is in the menu at the top of this page) or by contacting me directly at 304-266-5207 or cartwrightscreations@gmail.com.   Pens and pencils are $40 each or $50 when personalized.  Please let me know if you have any questions.

The Creative Arts Center holds a special place in my WVU memories.   It was built in the late 1960s while I was an undergraduate at WVU.  My grandfather was the construction superintendent working for Baker and Coombs, Inc. as the main boss over all aspects of the construction of the CAC.  He got me a job as a union laborer in the summers.   Being the low man on the totem pole and also the big boss’ grandson, I seemed to be the one who got some of the more undesirable jobs but the wages of $2.25 an hour were much better than my wages back home on the farm.

A few years ago, I was vending at a show in Buckhannon and met a gentleman who was intrigued with my WVU collection of woods and told me he was a retired professor from the School of Music.  I challenged him to find me some wood from the CAC.  He responded with several pieces of mahogany for a piano and a couple of legs from piano stools, all from the CAC.   As is my practice, he got a free pen (or two) from the wood.   I chose to highlight the mahogany ones since mahogany is such a beautiful wood and one that I don’t have much of since it isn’t used nearly as much as other more common woods.

A special thanks to Dr. William Skidmore, Professor Emeritus, for this addition to my collection.

Pens and pencils are available in a variety of styles and hardware colors as shown in the chart beside the photograph.  They can be ordered from my Store (a link is located at the top of this page) or by contacting me directly at 304-266-5207 or cartwrightscreations@gmail.com.   Pens and pencils are $40 each or $50 when personalized.  Please let me know if you have any questions.

Today’s feature is the WVU Coliseum.  This maple was reclaimed from the floor of the Coliseum which opened in the fall of 1970 on the Evansdale campus and replaced the Old Fieldhouse (later named Stansbury Hall) as the home of WVU basketball.  I have two cards about the coliseum – one that celebrates the first public event held there, a Grand Funk Railroad concert, and another which salutes Levi Phillips, a Charleston High star, who make the first basket ever made in a basketball game as a freshman on December 1, 1970.  I will enclose a copy of each card with the purchase of any coliseum pen. 

While a player at WVU, Coach Huggins made over 80% of his free throw shots.  He was named Head Coach for WVU men’s basketball in 2007, thirty years after he graduated from WVU.

Pens and pencils are available in a variety of styles and hardware colors as shown in the chart below.  They can be ordered from the Store on the menu at the top of this page or by contacting me directly at 304-266-5207 or cartwrightscreations@gmail.com.   Pens and pencils are $40 each or $50 when personalized.  Please let me know if you have any questions.

Today’s feature is Stewart Hall, one of the iconic buildings on the downtown campus, sitting beside the Mountainlair.   This cherry was reclaimed during a renovation of the President’s conference room.  My memory of Stewart Hall is having my computer programming classes in the basement.  Yes, in the late 60’s the entire computer programming program was housed in the basement there.

I will provide a brief architectural and historic description as found in the application for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places.

Stewart Hall is a historic library and administration building associated with the West Virginia University and located at MorgantownMonongalia County, West Virginia. It was built between 1900 and 1902, and consists of a gabled central block, a 2 1/2 story gabled entrance pavilion, and a monumental octagonal tower. It is built of reinforced concrete and coursed Amherst sandstone blocks and is in the Romanesque Revival style. The interior features a two-story, arcaded rotunda. It housed the university library until 1931, when it became the Administration Building. It was renamed in the 1970s in honor of Irvin Stewart, president of the University from 1946 to 1958. 1

 1 Rodney S. Collins (March 1980). “National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Stewart Hall”(PDF). State of West Virginia, West Virginia Division of Culture and History, Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2011-08-18

Pens and pencils are available in a variety of styles and hardware colors as shown in the chart.  They can be ordered from the Store (listed on the menu above) or by contacting me directly at 304-266-5207 or cartwrightscreations@gmail.com.   Pens and pencils are $40 each or $50 when personalized.  Please let me know if you have any questions.

Today’s is a very special and limited availability piece.  In 1959 the Mountaineers upset the rival Pitt Panthers who were ranked #20 in the nation.   Following the 25-15 upset following a strong Mountaineer tradition, the rowdies rushed the field and tore down the wooden goal posts.   Yes, in the 50s, the goal post were wooden.   A friend of mine’s father was among the rowdies and each of them took a piece of Mountaineer history home.  Kenny Shock graciously shared the wood with me in return for pens for himself, his two sons, and his sister.  You can also share in this unique history with a pen turned from this wood.  It has limited availability since I can only make 6 more pens and only in the bullet style but can be made in either gold or gun metal finish.  You will also get a picture of the part of the board where Mr. Shock wrote the score and his name.

This item is not in my website store, so you need to either e-mail me at cartwrightscreations@gmail.com or call my cell at 304-266-5207.  
First come first served.   Great gift for the real Mountaineer fan.

Pens can be personalized at no additional cost!